Status: Physical literacy is synonymous with fundamental movement skills. It is used by the national sport federation and various sport associations to increase sport participation and find athletic talent. The first three stages of the LTAD model (Active Start, FUNdamentals and Learning to Train) target children ages 6 to 12 and are treated together as physical literacy. The Dutch Sport Federation uses the term “physical alphabet” to describe the FUNdamentals stage. The term “physical alphabet” is used to describe the development of fundamental movement skills such as kicking, jumping, skating, and hitting. In the Netherlands, physical literacy is not explicitly used as a framework for physical education.[62]

Leadership and Funding: The government funds the Dutch Sport Federation (NOC*NSF), which supports programs focusing on the development of fundamental movement skills, one component of physical literacy.[63]

Sector and Venue: Physical literacy is taught and developed through organized sport, provided in the school setting, and practiced/delivered to teach sport-specific skills.  

Key Resource: 

Sport Agenda 2016: Notably, the agenda aims to increase participation in sport and to keep participants engaged over the long term.[64]  

Definition: No explicit definition exists in the Netherlands, however, they do use physical literacy to refer to the development of fundamental movement skills. Physical literacy is sometimes accompanied by the concept of “physical alphabet,” a term used by the Dutch Sport Federation to describe the FUNdamentals stage of the LTAD model and, more generally, the development of fundamental movement skills such as kicking, jumping, skating, and hitting.[65] 

Sport Teams, NSOs: Physical literacy is taught and developed through programs run by the Dutch Sport Federation (NOC*NSF) and various sport associations. It is a concept most used in the context of the policies of the national sport federation (NOC*NSF) and different sport associations. Those governing sports such as swimming, volleyball, and track and field use physical literacy in plans that engage children in their sport. In these plans, physical literacy is used interchangeably with fundamental movement skills within the LTAD model. The idea is that children with an extensive movement repertoire will be more skillful in their sport and will drop out of sports at lower rates.